Wednesday, 27 July 2011

That's new

    Annoying, all this, isn't it. A new facet of the wild and wacky world of gender dysphoria has edged into my experience these last few weeks. Getting down when confronted with happy attractive women is old hat, but here's a new one. I've found myself being pushed over the edge by middle-aged blokes. WTF? I hear you say?
    I guess it's the summer weather and the industry I work in, I seem to be seeing a lot of Typical British Middle Aged Blokes at the moment. You know, paunchy, losing hair, slightly unkempt. And I'm seeing a possible future for myself and thinking "I don't want to end up like that!".
    Crazy, isn't it. But that's the way of this annoying existence. I'll get over it. And hey! I've got Finasteride and they haven't! Funny, talking to blokes on that subject, they have a morbid fear of the Family Jewels not working but they hate the hair loss. I'm beginning to realise new extents to which I'm not one of them.
    So normal service will no doubt be resumed in time. I'll answer the comments on the last few posts that I feel guilty about neglecting. And life will go on. A bit more annoying, that's all.

9 comments:

  1. At the very least Jenny you have a choice don't you? If you hadn't dysphoria and the options that go with it, if you take them of course, what choices would you have as a middle-aged bloke with a sagging belly, shrivelled nuts and a bald head? The point is, we have to learn to be happy with what we've got in life else go all out to change things. Some choice eh?
    Love

    Shirley Anne xxx

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  2. I never even pretended to be a bloke but would be horrified when someone swept up me from my middle ground and added me to their blokes category. The sad realisation that the hair was thinning out and getting coarser with age and some of the other old bloke options which just might sneak up and get me really helped push me forward on my path.

    Family jewels, is that an oxymoron?

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  3. It was very much a light bulb moment when I learned how much men -all of them, apparently -like their willies....

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  4. Does make you wonder where the expression " that gives me the willies" comes from.

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  5. It's a hell of a choice, make no mistake. I guess I already have less belly and more hair than my contemporaries, which is a result.

    Having never as it were made a study of willies I never fully appreciated the relationship owning one is supposed to require. I just figured indifference was the norm :)

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  6. My cow-orkers frequently expressed favourable opinions about their willies, but I just put it down to them being the sort of people who would ork a cow without so much as a by-your-leave. It was the Relate councillor who expressed a fondness for his own that persuaded me that it wasn't simply a trait of the more simian among us....

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  7. Well you know what they say about people who boast (about their willies), theirs is probably nothing to boast about!

    Shirley Anne xxx

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  8. The here and now is a struggle at the best of times but I had a light bulb moment when talking through my future in therapy. The discussions made me realise that ageing as a 'male' was something that would really push me over the edge (what edge I am not sure). It was that, plus a general unhappiness, that forced me to seek some solutions.

    As for the willy bit - sticks out, looks ugly and has little purpose. What's to like ?

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  9. Funnily enough I'm reminded of a trans woman of my acquaintance. Now post-op, she seems quite happy to tell all and sundry how er.. well-endowed she was back in her bloke days. Most odd.

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