Thursday, 27 December 2012

Not just for Christmas

    Christmas has passed, leaving a trail of silver paper and flatulence. This year's was a good one as it happens, lacking too many familial complications. Just my parents, and us two. No awkward phone calls from feuding siblings or aunts.
    As I mentioned, I was girl for the day again. I cooked the meal, for which my mother was very thankful.
    My mother surprised me, by offering me some of her surplus clothing. If you're reminded of the passage in Bridget Jones' Diary in which Bridget is dressed by her mother in a frightfully frumpy outfit at Christmas then think again, I'm blessed with a mother with taste. She gave me a very simple black dress from one of the lesser-known suppliers specialising in clothing for very tall women, and as you might expect it works very well on someone with my body shape.
    So all in all a success. And as always, not entirely easy to come back from. Like those Dogs Trust adverts: being transgender is for life, not just for Christmas. Annoying, innit.
    The countryside is very wet indeed, everywhere is either muddy or flooded. I squelched through some more pruning on Boxing Day, then exercised my mother's dog. As a rather diminutive mutt she's not overly keen on splashing through flooded footpaths, poor thing.
    So back to work today in a nearly deserted office. Extended coffee breaks with the couple of nearby colleagues, long lunchtime. Nice in a way, but kinda heightens the feeling of isolation being one of a few dozen in a place that normally houses hundreds of people. And over it all hanging the spectre of January's GIC visit. It's funny, there are people now recovering form GRS who entered that pathway after I did and I'm still the scruffy bloke to my peers. I'm not sorry to have spent that last few years the way I have though because I am certain that more people than would admit it move forward in haste down the path of gender medicine only to repent at leisure.
    I just wish I had a definite resolution from it all though.

8 comments:

  1. Glad you had a decent Christmas, Jenny. I wish I'd had a mother like yours...

    Good luck at the Clinic.

    Lucy

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  2. I hope that 2013 is a positive one for you both.

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  3. Good to know you had a good christmas, It's one of the things I am glad for having accepting family.
    All the best to you and your family this coming year. =)

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  4. Glad you had a nice time too Jenny. I'm thinking mom's clothes must be very near your size, that is a bonus, I was about to say a 'plus' then realised it an inappropriate thing to say. Anyway I hope some good decisions are made during the coming year, ones that will make you happy.

    Shirley Anne x

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  5. Shirley's comment made me think that if you can wear your mother's clothes with style, than she must be your size. If she can pull off living with grace for her life then you can do it too. There are larger women in the world, but we must find our own pace and path to walk. Happy New Year!!!

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  6. A dog is not just for Christmas ~ if you carve it properly there shoudl be enough left over for boxing day as well.

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  7. Well, as others have said, I'm really pleased for you that you had a good Christmas with your family.

    I'm with you on the work front. I was in today and there was just me and another colleague in the room for most of the day. OK, a couple of minor emergencies perked the day up, but ug...

    And, of course, I hope that you can get something at the clinic. Sterkte.

    Stace

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  8. Thanks everyone, and thanks for your good wishes for my GIC visit. And I've already made the joke about the canine diet with my friend Rebecca who had an unwelcome dog of a friend's fostered on her over the season. My mother's dog is safe, fortunately.

    I am very fortunate in my parents. They aren't wild about my condition, but they recognise it's the way I am and are making the best of it.

    Today was another long and quiet day in the office. Roll on normality I say.

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